Serious auto accident injuries can result in job loss, long-term disability and chronic pain. If you or a family member has suffered this type of injury, you may be able to recover your costs in court if another driver caused the accident.

Read on to learn about the types of compensation you may be able to claim after a Connecticut auto accident injury and how to pursue a case.

What damages can the court award?

Connecticut does not limit the monetary damages an injured person can receive after an auto accident. You may be able to collect compensation for the following:

  • The value of damaged property
  • Medical costs
  • Physical and emotional pain and suffering
  • Lost wages

When the other driver acted recklessly or deliberately, the court may double or triple the damages awarded to the plaintiff as a punitive measure.

Who is responsible for the costs of an auto accident injury?

Auto accident liability in Connecticut follows the modified comparative fault standard. This means that if the court finds the injured party is less than 50% responsible for the accident, he or she can recover damages. However, the judge reduces the amount of the damages by the plaintiff’s fault percentage.

For insurance purposes, Connecticut is a fault state. This means that injured drivers can choose to pursue compensation from the legal system, through their own auto insurance policy or through the other driver’s auto insurance policy.

What is the statute of limitations for a Connecticut auto accident suit?

You must file a legal claim within two years of the motor vehicle accident. If the impact of the accident is not immediately evident, such as with a traumatic brain injury, the statute of limitations begins when your doctor diagnoses the injury. Seek immediate medical care when you suffer an auto accident injury.

Whether you already filed an insurance claim and received an unsatisfactory settlement or are not sure what route to take after an accident injury, legal assistance is available. Under state law, you are eligible for damages when a disabling injury results from another person’s negligence.