What is a Traumatic Brain Injury?

Athletes who participate in contact sports such as hockey or football have an expression for the collisions that leave an athlete seeing stars - getting your bell rung. Ten to 15 years ago the remedy for this type of collision was to sit out a play or two and walk off the initial effects of the collision. However, as the understanding of the brain has increased, along with the highly publicized concussions suffered by professional athletes, the effects of concussions and other traumatic brain injuries (TBI) have come to the fore of the public discussion.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that every year approximately 1.7 million people suffer TBIs. While concussions - most often associated with athletes - make up the majority of TBIs suffered, you do not need to be an athlete to suffer a concussion or other brain injury.

TBIs range from mild to severe and can be suffered after any bump, blow or jarring of the head. Beyond contact sports, people are often at risk of suffering a TBI during an accident, such as a slip and fall or car accident.

Symptoms of TBI

There are many symptoms that can be suffered after a TBI. Common symptoms of TBI include:

  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Blurred vision
  • Loss of consciousness during accident
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Confusion
  • Fatigue
  • Changes in mood
  • Problems concentrating
  • Memory issues
  • Nausea or vomiting

According to the CDC, most people will recover fully after suffering a mild TBI or concussion. However, those that suffer a severe TBI may never fully recover and require prolonged treatment. Treatment for a severe brain injury may include physical therapy, occupation therapy or speech therapy, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Medical professionals are able to address your physical needs after suffering a TBI, but other issues may remain. If you received a brain injury or TBI as the result of an accident, speak with a personal injury attorney to find out if you can recover for your medical bills, lost wages, and pain and suffering.