Connecticut Workers’ Compensation: An Exclusive Remedy For Injured Workers

The Connecticut Workers' Compensation Act was unanimously adopted in 1913 and is very similar to the current version that is effective law today. One of the purposes of the original act was to create an 'exclusive remedy' for employees injured on the job in Connecticut. Workers' compensation being the exclusive remedy for injured workers means that an injured employee cannot sue his or her employer for money damages related to the injury.

The benefit to employees is that, after injury, the injured worker does not have to prove that his or her employer was negligent in order to qualify for Connecticut medical and/or wage benefits under the workers' compensation system. The injured worker need only show that he or she was injured in an activity that arises out of, or happened in the course of, employment. A New Haven workers' compensation lawyer can more fully explain whether an injury is covered under the Connecticut system.

Exceptions To The Exclusive Remedy Bar To Work Injury Lawsuits

The Connecticut workers' compensation system does not entirely bar all civil actions for money damages related to work injuries. There are two exceptions to the exclusive remedy rule:

  • Injuries caused by an intentional act of the employer
  • Injuries caused by the negligence of an employer who is not insured under the workers' compensation system

Also, a worker who is injured by the negligent or bad acts of another individual may have a third-party claim against that person for his or her injuries. The exclusive remedy of the workers' compensation system does not necessarily bar an employee from working with a New Haven third-party liability lawyer to pursue another person who is not his or her employer for money damages for injuries.

What Does Connecticut's 'Exclusive Remedy' Cover For Injured Workers?

If an employee is injured while working in Connecticut, the workers' compensation system covers both medical expenses related to the injury as well as any lost wages. Temporary total disability, temporary partial disability and permanent partial disability are types of wage benefits covered by workers' compensation. Additionally, wage benefits may also include payments for scarring, disfigurement or a wage differential may be available, depending on the employee's job and injury.

If you've been injured while on the job in Connecticut, contacting a workers' compensation attorney in your area can help you understand your right to benefits as well as any necessary steps you must take and deadlines you must meet in order to smoothly claim medical and lost wages benefits. If your initial request for workers' compensation was denied, an attorney can discuss the ability to appeal your case to the Connecticut Workers' Compensation Commission.